Sicilian rector seeks opinion from Education Minister Carozza on Italian “race law”

Catania Today, reports (http://tinyurl.com/ctd8vdl  – legge discriminatoria e anticostituzionale )  that the recently elected Magnificent Rector of the University of Catania, Giacomo Pignataro, an economist, who holds a PhD from the University of York has written to the Minister an for Higher EducationMaria Chiara Carrozza – an industrial engineer, for her opinion on the cutting by 40% of the wages of its foreign teachers.

Giacoamo Pignataro, Magnificent Rector of the University of Studies of Catania

Giacoamo Pignataro, Magnificent Rector of the University of Studies of Catania

The Rector says he intends to offer the foreign lecturers at Catania a “coherent reply in conformity with the law”.

Decisions of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) are binding on all public authorities (including universities and governments) inside the European Union. The reason it is binding is because it emanates from a Treaty.

The ECJ ruled that the foreign lecturers, “lettori,  are entitled to the minimum salary and pensions of researchers. The University of Catania, until recently, adhered to this principle.

The problem which Minister Carrozza will have to grapple with is:

Is the recent decision of the University of Catania to cut the salaries of its foreign teachers by 40% – thereby reversing binding judgments of the ECJ –  legitimate?

Could a law, passed during Mr Berlusconi’s tenure, the so-called  “Gelmini” law  – which “extinguishes” the rights of these foreign workers to a final judicial decision –  be discriminatory and  anti-constitutional?

The Gelmini law, Article 26, applies to foreign lecturers – and only to them – and is therefore a “race law” both in intention and practice*.

Italy was first found to be discriminating against its foreign lecturers in the European Court of Justice on 30 May 1989 – since then there have been a further 5 judgments in the ECJ – all of which found Italy to be in breach of the Treaty it first signed up to in Rome in 1957.

* See also, “race law”  – Times Higher Education:  http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/lettori-suffer-50-paycut/2003066.article

Maria Chiara Carrozza, Italian Minister for Higher Education

Maria Chiara Carrozza, Italian Minister for Higher Education

 

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This entry was posted in ALLSI, David Willetts, Discrimination based on nationality in Italian universities, European Commission, European Parliament, Free movement of workers in EU, Gelmini reform, Mario Monti, Mark Lazarowicz, Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Politics, UK Government and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Sicilian rector seeks opinion from Education Minister Carozza on Italian “race law”

  1. Tony Lawson says:

    The lettori at the University of Catania firmly believe that anyone interested in looking seriously at the question from a juridical point of view can come to only one conclusion: the 40% pay cut is totally unjustifed as is the professional dequalification. Neither have any legal basis whatsoever. Let us hope that the people studying the question are indeed serious.

  2. Inch Colm says:

    It would seem the intent of the Rector is clear; either Minister Carrozza accepts that the law is discriminatory and therefore must do something about it or she does not and is willing to put the government’s approval to the Gelmini law so leaving it open to all other Italian universities to do the same as Catania and Bergamo. In either case the universities are off the hook and in becomes a government (and lettori) problem

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